Ian’s Legal Fact of the Week 2/15/16: ‘Ladies Nights’ as Discrimination

The practice of holding a “ladies’ night’‘ as a promotional event at bars and nightclubs has been often challenged on state and federal grounds. While challenges under the Equal Protection Clause and the Civil Rights Act of 1871 have failed, four … Continue reading

Ian’s Legal Fact of the Week 2/8/16: Jury Sequestration in New York

For more than a century New York state required that juries be sequestered during the deliberation phase of all trials for violent felonies. This extremely unpopular law was repealed in 2001. Missouri still makes jury sequestration mandatory in trials involving a charge … Continue reading

Ian’s Legal Fact of the Week 1/25/16: Reporter’s Privilege

Related to the spousal privilege, attorney-client privilege, and priest-penitent privilege, the reporter’s privilege (also known as a ‘press shield law’) is provided for in 48 states and the District of Columbia, either statutorily or through judicial decisions. Federal courts have also … Continue reading

Ian’s Legal Fact of the Week 1/18/16: The Admission of Ohio into the Union

President Thomas Jefferson signed an Act of Congress approving Ohio’s statehood in 1803, making it the 17th state. Congress had never passed a resolution formally admitting it as a state, however. While this has no real constitutional significance, this oversight was … Continue reading

Ian’s Legal Fact of the Week 1/4/16: Presidents Who Served on the Supreme Court

William Howard Taft, the 27th President of the United States (1909-1913), remains the only president to also serve on the Supreme Court.  He served as the tenth Chief Justice, from 1921-1930.

Ian’s Legal Fact of the Week 4/11/16: ‘Be Kind to Lawyers’ Day

Distressingly, there is no official “Lawyer’s Day” in the U.S.–despite the fact that nearly half of the members of Congress are lawyers. In fact, a member of Congress in 2015 was 66x more likely to be a lawyer than the average … Continue reading